Newfoundland Recipes – saltjunk.com

Everything Newfoundland & Labrador with its Culture, Cuisine and Traditions

Steamed Figgy Pudding

What is a “Figgy Pudding”? Very simple, a pudding made with figs not raisins. After much research on this topic there is much evidence to this confirmation. Back in the early 1800s, leaveners used were eggs and steam with the possibility of adding pearl ash. Not until 1830s (baking soda) and 1840s (baking soda & cream of tartar = baking powder) were introduced. The recipe below reflects the period of the early 1800s. You can use a pudding bowl, basin or pudding bag.

Photo by Chief Instructor Chef Mark, Liaison College Oakville, ON.

Makes 4-6 servings

Prepare pudding bowl as per instructions.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 1 cup sugar
  • Pinch salt
  • Pinch ground nutmeg
  • 1 cup chopped suet
  • 1 cup stale breadcrumbs
  • 1¾ cups chopped dried figs
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 7 oz milk
  • Butter (greasing bowl)

METHOD

In a large bowl, mix flour, sugar, salt, nutmeg, suet, breadcrumbs, and figs. Add eggs and milk to mixture, stir until well blended.

Spoon batter in a well-greased 1-quart pudding bowl with butter and steam for 2.5 hours. Once steaming is completed, lift pudding bowl from pan and remove foil and parchment paper. Cool for 10 minutes. Using a palette knife, loosen all around the pudding and remove pudding by gently shaking onto a serving plate. Serve with cream or custard.

Note: Adding 1 tsp of baking powder to this recipe gives the pudding a nice rise.

Instructions on how to Steam a Pudding

1. Make a lid using foil and parchment paper to cover top of bowl;
2. Form a pleat (1 inch) in middle of both foil and parchment paper;
3. Place on top of bowl and form around;
4. Tie in place and create a handle before placing in steamer or lidded pan;
5. Use boiling water and ensure water level inside pan reaches half-way up bowl;
6. Check at 30-minute intervals to ensure it does not boil dry;
7. Water level should not fall below 1 quarter up the bowl; add
8. Add boiling water when necessary.

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Steamed Gingerbread Pudding

This traditional steamed pudding recipe is from the 1800s. No chemical leaveners were used back then. I have spoken to elder folks around NL, and they stated that traditional puddings were more flavorful, rich and warming, it didn’t taste like today’s puddings. Presented here is the recipe as it would have appeared during that time. You can use a pudding basin or pudding bag.

Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

  • 5 oz hot milk
  • 2 tbsp cooking molasses
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 1½ cups stale breadcrumbs
  • 1 tbsp white sugar
  • 6 oz suet
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 4 oz all-purpose flour
  • Butter (greasing bowl)

METHOD

In a saucepan over medium to high heat, bring milk to a simmer (do not boil) and let it cool to 145° F. Stir in molasses and egg until molasses is dissolved. Add breadcrumbs, sugar and suet, mix well. In a large bowl, sift flour and ginger. Add milk pan contents to bowl and combine mixtures thoroughly.

Spoon batter (which is very thick) in a well-greased 1-quart pudding bowl with butter and steam for two hours. Once steaming is completed, lift pudding bowl from pan and remove foil and parchment paper. Cool for 10 minutes. Using a palette knife, loosen all around the pudding and remove pudding by gently shaking onto a serving plate. Serve with cream or custard.

Instructions on how to Steam a Pudding

1. Make a lid using foil and parchment paper to cover top of bowl;
2. Form a pleat (1 inch) in middle of both foil and parchment paper;
3. Place on top of bowl and form around;
4. Tie in place and create a handle before placing in steamer or lidded pan;
5. Use boiling water and ensure water level inside pan reaches half-way up bowl;
6. Check at 30-minute intervals to ensure it does not boil dry;
7. Water level should not fall below 1 quarter up the bowl; add
8. Add boiling water when necessary.

 

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Bologna & Apple Cabbage

A002-w2Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb bologna, ½“ cubed
  • ¼ cup butter
  • 2 apples, sliced ¼“ thick
  • 3 cups finely shredded cabbage
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • ½ tsp ground nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp ground clove
  • Salt & pepper

METHOD

In a skillet over medium heat, sauté bologna in butter until lightly brown.  Add and toss remaining ingredients. Season to taste. Cover and simmer for 12-15 minutes or until cabbage and apples are tender.

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Lemon Squares 1968

This Lemon Squares recipe is from 1968 and uses soda crackers and flour for its crust. Very easy to make and absolutely delicious. The original recipe calls for 1 cup of sugar, however, I thought it was extremely sweet so I cut it down to 1/4 cup. Although the original recipe just stated coconut, I used unsweetened. Also, I used margarine instead of butter.  Try it and let me know how it turns out…..

Lemon-Squares1Makes 24 squares

Preheat oven to 350°F

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pk (7½ oz) sheriff lemon pie filling
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • ¾ cup butter or margarine, room temperature
  • ¾ cup unsalted soda crackers, finely crushed
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • 1½ cups unsweetened flaked coconut

METHOD

Prepare lemon pie filling as per package directions. Remove from heat and cool.

In a bowl, sift flour and baking powder. Rub in butter or margarine until crumbs are formed. Add crushed soda crackers, sugar and coconut. Mix until well blended. Spread half of crumb mixture into a well-greased or parchment lined 9 inch square pan. Press mixture evenly to form a crust. Spread lemon filling evenly over crust and sprinkle remainder of crumb mixture over lemon filling. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool on rack prior to cutting into squares.

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About saltjunk.com

Newfoundland Photos-saltjunk.comSaltjunk.com is a website dedicated to Newfoundlanders and Labradoreans at home and abroad, and to other folks who simply enjoy NL culture, cuisine and its traditions. With completion of a Culinary Management program at Liaison College, Oakville, Ont, a Certificate in Baking at George Brown College, Toronto, Ont and a course in Food Photography; my purpose is to add new NL recipes to the existing culinary library and revisit some of the older ones and fine-tune them using today’s techniques (if possible). Also, I want to preserve some of the older and forgotten recipes that have been lost with time.

Re-discover Newfoundland and Labrador Cuisine, bring out the old recipes that your grandma and mom had written down on old scribblers or cook up recipes that were passed down from generation to generation. Relive again the taste. Experience the flavours and aromas that were once an everyday occurrence in our childhood. Can you smell the aroma of old fashion bread baking with a roaster full of hot baked beans in the oven?

Come taste times gone by and traditions of Newfoundland and Labrador. There’s a centuries-old tradition of ingenuity, imagination and inspiration in every morsel. Consider the true blend of Aboriginal, English, French, German, Irish, Portuguese, Scottish and Spanish ancestry in our very unique cuisine.

Savour and experience recipes from times past, such as; Fish & Brewis, Fried Cod Tongues, Cod Fish Stew, Fish Cakes, Toutons, Salt Junk Dinner, Pease Pudding, pea Soup, Dumplings, Cabbage Soup, Colcannon, Flipper Pie, Pan Fried brook Trout, Turr, Baked Salt Water Duck, John Bull Stew, Drawn Butter, Kedgaree, Wild Hare (Rabbit) Stew and Pie, Old Fashioned Bake Beans, Figgy Duff, Pork Bang Belly, Beaslin Cake, Lobsouse, Bake Cod Row, just to name a few.

Just maybe, we can bring back “the good ole times” our grandparents and parents once shared at the kitchen parties, card games, mummering and telling yarns, while we cook up a good scoff with our friends.

If you have any old family recipes pass down or new ones you want to share with the world, please send them to me. If you like, forward a photo of the dish and your recipe, I will post it.

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